Disk utility updating boot support partitions volume required

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Also note that if you buy a Mac from Apple today with Fusion Drive, it DOES come with a Recovery Partition, so it is indeed possible to do.

It turns out that Apple's Core Storage technology is more flexible than these walkthroughs give on.

This Terminal script vastly speeds up checking big volumes.

The tool behind Disk Utility's volume checking is , which can also be run from the command line.

A nice side effect is that this also puts less stress on the disk, as most reads are served from the cache.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/

Also note that if you buy a Mac from Apple today with Fusion Drive, it DOES come with a Recovery Partition, so it is indeed possible to do.It turns out that Apple's Core Storage technology is more flexible than these walkthroughs give on.This Terminal script vastly speeds up checking big volumes.The tool behind Disk Utility's volume checking is , which can also be run from the command line.A nice side effect is that this also puts less stress on the disk, as most reads are served from the cache.Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!The above steps did the trick and everything was working again as expected.

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Also note that if you buy a Mac from Apple today with Fusion Drive, it DOES come with a Recovery Partition, so it is indeed possible to do.

It turns out that Apple's Core Storage technology is more flexible than these walkthroughs give on.

This Terminal script vastly speeds up checking big volumes.

The tool behind Disk Utility's volume checking is , which can also be run from the command line.

A nice side effect is that this also puts less stress on the disk, as most reads are served from the cache.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/

Also note that if you buy a Mac from Apple today with Fusion Drive, it DOES come with a Recovery Partition, so it is indeed possible to do.It turns out that Apple's Core Storage technology is more flexible than these walkthroughs give on.This Terminal script vastly speeds up checking big volumes.The tool behind Disk Utility's volume checking is , which can also be run from the command line.A nice side effect is that this also puts less stress on the disk, as most reads are served from the cache.Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!The above steps did the trick and everything was working again as expected.

||

Also note that if you buy a Mac from Apple today with Fusion Drive, it DOES come with a Recovery Partition, so it is indeed possible to do.

It turns out that Apple's Core Storage technology is more flexible than these walkthroughs give on.

This Terminal script vastly speeds up checking big volumes.

The tool behind Disk Utility's volume checking is , which can also be run from the command line.

A nice side effect is that this also puts less stress on the disk, as most reads are served from the cache.

Adding the little shell script below to your command line tools can make your life a lot easier. The drive is unmounted during the check and remounted when finished. /bin/bash # Run a fast volume check on large Time Machine backup disks export VOLUME=/Volumes/$1 echo "Determining disk device of $VOLUME" export DISK=`diskutil info $VOLUME | sed -n '/ Device Node\:/s/.* \(\/dev\/disk.*\).*/\1/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

/p'` if [ "$DISK" = "" ]; then echo "Unable to determine device name!

disk utility updating boot support partitions volume required-64

You can also tweak it to display a Mount/Unmount dialog if you wish. Trimming an SSD is a way of optimizing the read/write/modify process for the device.Such boot drives are easy to create on your own, here are instructions for making boot disks for OS X 10.9, OS X 10.8, and OS X 10.7.For older Macs running prior versions of OS X, typically anything running OS X 10.6 or earlier will have a Super Drive, and thus shipped with a bootable DVD that can serve this same purpose.I like to eject my external drives because they slow down my mac when they spin up, but I want to have an easy way to access them if I need to.I wrote a little Apple Script that will toggle the mount status of the drive (if it's mounted, it will eject, if it's unmounted, it will mount). Updating boot support partitions for the volume as required.

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